The Open Mat Forum

Miscellaneous => Off-Topic => Topic started by: buck on August 03, 2018, 09:24:28 AM

Title: NFL
Post by: buck on August 03, 2018, 09:24:28 AM
Essentially a rough game of basketball now.  Unwatchable.

Penalty now for tackling.


Tried watching the game last night between Ravens and Bears but it just made me sick.

Pussification of America is almost complete.  Orange slices and drink pops should be served by the players mothers on the sidelines.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: RYou on August 03, 2018, 09:45:57 AM
Opportune time for professional rugby to creep into the states.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: buck on August 03, 2018, 12:00:46 PM
I agree that would be great!
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: ctc on August 12, 2018, 07:34:01 AM
They are still allowing protests and I am still boycotting.  Not even a dog bites the hand that feeds it.  Not smart.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: a guest on August 12, 2018, 11:09:56 AM
Opportune time for professional rugby to creep into the states.

Heck, I'd like to see the NCAA recognize Rugby for men and women.

Alas, too much of a competition for football.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: mspart on August 13, 2018, 11:06:31 AM
Seahawks lost last week.  I didn't see the game. 

mspart
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: buck on August 19, 2018, 05:16:32 PM
Conservative wackos have ruined the sport. 
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: Bob H. on August 19, 2018, 07:55:21 PM
Conservative wackos have ruined the sport.

Gee, and here I thought it was the left-wing nut jobs.

Maybe we're both right.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: buck on August 19, 2018, 07:57:36 PM
Perhaps but not allowing hitting is conservative counsel recommending caution for fear of being sued.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: RYou on August 19, 2018, 08:33:49 PM
Fear of being sued ?   The NFL has accrued $502 million in settlement as of 7/31 only 80% have been through the baseline assessment.  The original $ 1 billion reserve is being up'd to $1.4 billion.  It's all paid out under workers compensation which is self insured by the NFL.



Title: Re: NFL
Post by: buck on August 21, 2018, 09:07:43 AM
Conservatives are off the rails.  Why ruin a great sport with ridiculous rules?
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: ViseGrip on August 22, 2018, 12:00:11 PM
Perhaps but not allowing hitting is conservative counsel recommending caution for fear of being sued.


LOL.... But I thought we were ruthless capitalists that couldnt care less for the worker?


Seriously buck, are you really bothered by the fact that the NFL (for whatever reason) is taking steps to protect the long term health of the players? Do you want the old rules that led to higher concussion rates?


No a similar note....

Some day.... you will see helmets like this on every player in every game.

(https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/kokomoperspective.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/08/008bd806-6ef2-5d3e-8ec3-c59e6e558564/5b70ccecdb1e7.image.jpg?resize=1200%2C1536)

Some may say this is silly, or that we're treating the players like babies. But I think taking reasonable steps like this may be the thing that actually saves football.

I LOOOVE football, but right now, it wouldnt bother me one bit if any of my future grandsons never played football. If this padding has a significant impact on reducing brain injury its immoral NOT to make them mandatory.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: RYou on August 22, 2018, 01:42:26 PM
Most NCAA teams are wearing it in contact practice. Just waiting to see if it happens on game day.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: buck on August 22, 2018, 04:16:02 PM
The risk of CTE in high school and younger is infinitesimal.  It's an absolute joke that parents are scared that their little boys will be injured.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: mspart on August 22, 2018, 04:53:21 PM
It is all the protective gear that allows for harder hits that don't hurt either player as much.   

mspart
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: RYou on August 22, 2018, 07:22:54 PM
The risk of CTE in high school and younger is infinitesimal.  It's an absolute joke that parents are scared that their little boys will be injured.

You don't get it Buck...CTE results from chronic head trauma, from micro to macro concussions.  Peewee and high school is just the initiation stage.  The effects from CTE take time to emerge, sometimes 20 sometimes 50 years.  I sense there is an aspect of individual sensitivity, like many diseases, which is the reason some of the baddest over the history of football and boxing never sustained the symptoms.

Besides, parents are as sensitive to CTE as they are to a plain old concussion. 
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: buck on August 23, 2018, 09:07:58 AM
No I get it.  Kind of like knee injuries start from the moment a child walks and the cumulative effects of gravity resulting in skeletal breakdowns.  The solution is for all of us to remain inert.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: RYou on August 23, 2018, 09:19:08 AM
...and build a country of Twiddle Dee's and Twiddle Dums.

...so flip your kids to soccer.......and concuss then with soccer balls.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: ViseGrip on August 23, 2018, 10:17:25 AM
The risk of CTE in high school and younger is infinitesimal.  It's an absolute joke that parents are scared that their little boys will be injured.


The brains of young boys and girls are more vulnerable.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: ViseGrip on August 23, 2018, 10:19:01 AM
No I get it.  Kind of like knee injuries start from the moment a child walks and the cumulative effects of gravity resulting in skeletal breakdowns.  The solution is for all of us to remain inert.


We all have to walk buck... We dont HAVE to subject our brains to repeated trauma
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: buck on August 23, 2018, 12:05:13 PM
I would rather subject my son to possible brain damage playing youth football than him becoming a pussy. 
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: ViseGrip on August 23, 2018, 03:14:38 PM
I would rather subject my son to possible brain damage playing youth football than him becoming a pussy.

So ALL kids who didnt play youth football are pussies?
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: buck on August 23, 2018, 05:18:26 PM
Pretty much. ;D
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: RYou on August 23, 2018, 07:35:07 PM
Mommies don't want their boys to grow up to be cowboys, just metro-nomes
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: mspart on August 23, 2018, 09:30:50 PM
Like this?

(https://media1.giphy.com/media/100BHdCMXyfUfS/giphy.gif)

Ha ha!!! 

mspart
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: a guest on August 26, 2018, 10:41:22 AM
Saw a sign across the street from a local park that advertised "tackle football ages 5 - 12" with a number to call for the local league.

Then I thought, "is youth football the only sport played just like the adult prodessional league?"

For instance, in soccer...no headers until 12.

In hockey, no checking in the younger leagues.

In wrestling, no 5-point throws until a certain age.

Title: Re: NFL
Post by: buck on August 26, 2018, 12:05:07 PM
Ever watch a youth football game?  22 marshmellows having fun.  Absolutely zero risk of injury.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: mspart on August 27, 2018, 11:15:39 AM
Hey when I played in 2nd and 3rd grade, it was life and death.  Then I watched the movies my dad made (8mm no sound) and it is pretty much like buck describes.  Growing up in Huntsville, AL, football was serious business.  But it was the 65 lb league and I was at 45 on a good day.  After 3rd grade I had to move up to the 85 lb league and my mom said no.  She didn't want me to get squished.  I didn't get above 65 lbs until 9th grade.  My dad took me to a local HS wrestling match between Butler HS and some other school and that was it, I had found my calling.  Started wrestling in 7th grade and have kept it up ever since. 

WRESTLING - It's in the blood.

mspart
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: ViseGrip on August 27, 2018, 05:10:25 PM
Ever watch a youth football game?  22 marshmellows having fun.  Absolutely zero risk of injury.

Here's some education.....

Quote
A report in the June 2016 issue of the Journal of Neurotrauma found that the likelihood of developing cognitive and emotional problems is linked to a football player’s overall exposure to contact and not just to his diagnosed concussions. In other words, every little hit adds up, which explains why NFL veterans who started playing before the age of 12 are more likely to have cognitive problems than those who picked up the game later. These days, many players start earlier — and the truly dedicated scrimmage all year long.

Quote
For years many doctors believed that children were less likely than adults to suffer serious head injuries in football, for the simple reason that they weigh less and run more slowly than adults do. Now it’s well understood that until about age 14, a kid’s head is much larger than an adult’s compared with his body, yet the neck is weaker, which means the head bounces around more in response to collisions. Researchers at Virginia Tech found that seven-year-old football players experienced head blows comparable in force to the impacts suffered by college players.

To make matters worse, the nerve fibers in children’s brains are not yet coated with the protective sheathing known as myelin. As a result, “it’s easier to tear apart neurons and their connections in children at lower impact,” says Dr. Robert Cantu, the author of Concussions and Our Kids and a leading researcher of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), the brain-wasting disease that has been diagnosed in dozens of deceased football players. The threat to emerging neural connections is particularly problematic at Brogan’s age. “If you injure your brain during that time,” Cantu says, “there is a high likelihood that you will not reach your maximal genetic endowment intellectually, and you’ll perhaps not have the same personality with regard to depression, anxiety, and panic attacks.”
www.mensjournal.com/features/how-an-11-year-olds-brain-injury-rattled-a-football-family-w448627/
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: RYou on August 27, 2018, 05:36:39 PM

Quote


Now it’s well understood that until about age 14, a kid’s head is much larger than an adult’s compared with his body, yet the neck is weaker, which means the head bounces around more in response to collisions.


This is similar reasoning behind the higher incidence of concussion in women's basketball at the collegiate level.  The cumulative impact of micro concussionssustained running up and down court, not elbows under the basket.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: mspart on August 27, 2018, 07:17:10 PM
Get bigger necks!   

I'd have to say the concussion research has come a long way from get back in there and quit crying.

mspart
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: buck on August 28, 2018, 07:29:08 AM
I'm getting menstrual cramps reading all this data about head injuries.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: Bob H. on August 28, 2018, 09:04:31 AM
I'm getting menstrual cramps reading all this data about head injuries.

You could always take some Midol.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: ViseGrip on August 28, 2018, 04:01:54 PM
I'm getting menstrual cramps reading all this data about head injuries.

At least now you know.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: buck on August 29, 2018, 09:10:10 AM
Breathing has complications.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: mspart on August 29, 2018, 11:26:08 AM
Breathing is deadly when it stops. 

mspart
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: a guest on August 30, 2018, 09:01:39 PM
Hey when I played in 2nd and 3rd grade, it was life and death.  Then I watched the movies my dad made (8mm no sound) and it is pretty much like buck describes.  Growing up in Huntsville, AL, football was serious business.  But it was the 65 lb league and I was at 45 on a good day.  After 3rd grade I had to move up to the 85 lb league and my mom said no.  She didn't want me to get squished.  I didn't get above 65 lbs until 9th grade.  My dad took me to a local HS wrestling match between Butler HS and some other school and that was it, I had found my calling.  Started wrestling in 7th grade and have kept it up ever since. 

WRESTLING - It's in the blood.

mspart


Mine went like this:

My sister drove me to Pop Warner signups.

When we arrived, two clinically obese men greeted us with clipboards.

I asked to place my name on the sign-up sheet.

The guy on the right asked my age.

I replied.

The guy on the left chuckled and said "Yur too small."

Then, we drove home.

I assume those two guys were dead by 40
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: Bob H. on August 31, 2018, 05:45:56 PM
I always wanted to wrestle, so I don't have one of those stories.  Mine was when I was 21 years old and in college.  The high school gym was open in the summers, so I lifted weights there because it was free, which was great for a broke college kid.

I was 5'-10" tall, with a walking around weight of 142 pounds. 

One day, I decided to try for a max on the bench.  After a few warmups, I put 275 pounds on the bar.

A big, fat high school football player said, "Are you gonna lift that?  HYUCK, HYUCK, HYUCK!"

"I'm gonna try."

I brought the bar to my chest, popped it back up and racked it.  The kids jaw was still on the floor when I got up.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: buck on September 19, 2018, 12:16:39 PM
Now illegal to tackle the QB.  Penalty on Clay Matthews cost Green Bay the win against Minnesota.  Not worth it anymore to even brush up against the QB.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: RYou on September 19, 2018, 05:18:48 PM

Actually it's called a Scoop and Pull which was the way you were taught to tackle years ago.  You just can't do it to a QB in the NFL anymore.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xn83NcpAQsg

He led with his shoulder...perfect
Right arm wrapped the hip...perfect
Left arm locked behind the knee with a pull....Scoop - PENALTY

He hit Cousins with enough force to knock him down without wrapping him up behind the knee.

What is borderline in that hit, Cousins never left the ground, the unscooped foot remained in contact.  It is usually called after the tackler lifts the QB off the ground and plants his back into the ground with the shoulder in the gut.  You are almost guaranteed to knock the wind out of the QB and send him to the sidelines for a set.

I had the luxury of making that hit on a defenseless punt returner...entirely legit hit off a perfectly timed 35 yard run into a stationery object, just after he caught the ball.  Best hit I ever put on someone.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: buck on September 20, 2018, 08:28:21 AM
Ridiculous.  Virtually every play in the NFL results in a penalty.

We play a drinking game that you can try yourselves.  You can't take a drink until a game goes 5 plays or more without a timeout/stoppage (replay/review, penalty, time out, injury, tv timeout, 2 minute warning).  I guarantee you'll be sober by end of game.

In the average NFL game now the ball is in play for only 12 minutes.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: buck on September 20, 2018, 08:38:37 AM
And this...

https://www.yahoo.com/sports/aaron-rodgers-believes-qb-protection-rules-going-wrong-direction-021320515.html
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: mspart on September 20, 2018, 10:42:01 AM
Yeah, what does he know?  Probably been hit in the head too many times to think straight anymore. 

mspart
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: buck on September 20, 2018, 11:15:44 AM
He gets quality poon though.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: RYou on September 20, 2018, 02:57:13 PM
If you watch in slomo, Cousins right leg goes elevated before it gets scooped..  Even the incoming angle and direction of the fall there is no way that leg wasn't going to get scooped unless the arm was left dangling at this side. Technically the call can't be challenged especially when refs are stuck with bang bang decisions, but that one could have gone without the flag
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: mspart on September 20, 2018, 03:24:01 PM
Seahawks lost 2 in a row.  Not watching anymore!!!

mspart
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: buck on September 20, 2018, 03:30:25 PM
Brady's career would have been cut by 60% if he had played in the 50's or 60's.
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: RYou on September 20, 2018, 03:40:32 PM
...and at 2% the current wage
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: mspart on September 21, 2018, 11:05:19 AM
Jack Youngblood played on a broken leg.  Different era for sure.

mspart
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: ViseGrip on October 04, 2018, 12:18:40 PM
Jack Youngblood played on a broken leg.  Different era for sure.

mspart

In the locker room he told the trainer to "tape an asprin to it".
Title: Re: NFL
Post by: mspart on October 04, 2018, 03:34:30 PM
Earl Thomas of the Seahawks brakes his leg, gets carted off and flips off the Seahawks sideline. 

There should be a clause in the contracts that pay doesn't happen for eggregious moments like that. 

Also in his case, contracts should be written that if you don't show up for practice, you lose 3 games pay.  Next day, another 3 games pay.  Leave the performance incentives alone. Base pay is gone.

mspart