Author Topic: Day 2 of Asian Wrestling Championships  (Read 2223 times)

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Day 2 of Asian Wrestling Championships
« on: May 13, 2010, 11:50:56 AM »
Day 2 consisted of freestyle for 55, 66, 84 & 120 Kg.

I must say that I was a little more happy today that there was less pageantry and dancing and more wrestling tonight. However, the security was even more visible tonight than last night.  I mean last night there was a large police presence with rifles and side arms, but tonight was a whole new level:  geiger counters at the entrance and roving inside the building.  Two weeks ago there was big news in Delhi regarding some missing Cobalt-60 rods, but this past weekend the papers stated all the rods we accounted for.  Still made me a bit uneasy.

Moving on....

As expected Sushil Kumar won the 66 kilo weight class.  The crowd cheered when he walked onto the mat, attempted a takedown, sprawled, scored a takedown, well....the crowed cheered after everything he did.  They were pretty excited that he won the gold.  Hopefully, there will be some coverage in the papers tomorrow.  I was a bit upset that there was no coverage in this morning's papers.  However, India's national cricket team in competing in the World Cup Twenty20 Cricket.  So everything takes a back burner to cricket.

The lone awkward moment was during the bronze match at 84 kilos.  There was a call made by the ref (the only American besides me in the building I guess) that both sides disputed and asked for a replay.  I had never known wrestling had instant replay until tonight.  Well, the score ended up changing so many times due to this check of instant reply that I forgot what the ref's original call was.  I think it should have been 2-1 *******stan, but I don't remember what the actual call was.....China won and it took a while for the *****stan guy to leave the mat.  Then he used some *******stan hand signal that I think was a put-down.  If I see the American ref this weekend, I'll ask him if he wants a cup of coffee over by our neck of the woods to decompress.  If that said ref is reading this forum, send me an email on TOM and I'll invite you over to our place for a pint of beer and a meal if the local food is too spicy for you.


Oh, I got really thirsty and tired as the matches went on.  For some reason the food stand would not sell me a coke.  Not sure why, they were right there in the fridge.  But, I was told that they were not for sale.  That made me grumpy.

Anywho, my thirst and tiredness made me want to go home after the 84 kilo gold medal (won yet again by a guy from Iran) so I came back home.

I talked to a handful of people in the stands.  I always think it is funny when you get a bunch of former wrestlers together, they always get to asking each other what you weigh.

Plus, props to the South Korean heavyweight wearing the Boston RedSox hat.  

Oh, and the singlets from Japan were the coolest out there tonight.  Sort of reminded me of those swimming suits you saw in the 2008 olympics.

Oh, and lastly, I forgot to mention this earlier.....but when I went to the Kushti gym on Monday morning one of the guys asked me if I knew Henry Cejudo.  I thought it was cool he knew who Henry is.

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Re: Day 2 of Asian Wrestling Championships
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2010, 06:08:36 AM »
I will not be able to give an update for Day 3 & 4.  Sorry guys.

The band that my wife is in will be performing their last two shows tonight and Saturday night.  So, I'll be going to that tonight (and possibly Saturday evening as well).  

However, I will be going to Day 5 (finals for Greco-Roman) on Sunday.

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Re: Day 2 of Asian Wrestling Championships
« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2010, 10:31:33 PM »
I did not go to last nights matches, but here is a decent write-up:  http://www.sportskeeda.com/2010/05/14/c ... mpionship/

Sounds like:  China, Japan, India, South Korea, North Korea, Mongolia.

Still not much coverage in the local papers.  There was a blurb this morning about women wrestlers, but the article did not talk about the finals matches (which were to start at 7:00  you can't tell me no reporter could stay later than 6:30)  And the paper talked about how upset the Iranian team's photographer was upset with the police/security for not letting him take photos of the wrestlers preparing before they stepped in the mat.

The Times of India has upset me with their lack of coverage.

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Re: Day 2 of Asian Wrestling Championships
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2010, 08:38:38 AM »
Awesome stuff..

Also you can see the matches here: http://www.fila-wrestling.com/webtv/
Aequitas - Veritas (is Latin)
Cóir - Fírinne
Justice - Truth

"College has become a cruel, expensive joke on the poor and the middle class, that benefits only the perpetrator of it." - Peter Gregory

Drooke

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Re: Day 2 of Asian Wrestling Championships
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2010, 10:39:13 PM »
Yo A GUEST!  Did you see who won 66kg at Worlds.....yep Sushil......I thought his name was familiar and it was then that I remembered this thread.

India's Sushil Kumar won the title at 66 kg/145.5 lbs. Kumar became India's first World champion.

Drooke

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Re: Day 2 of Asian Wrestling Championships
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2010, 02:40:59 AM »
http://www.latestsportsbuzz.com/?p=7071

Sushil Kumar: Wins Gold Medal: Becomes The First Indian World Wrestling Champion

Posted by Kabir_Bedi on Sep 13th, 2010
Sushil Kumar hails from small village of New Delhi. The name of the village is Baprola. His father Mr. Diwan Singh Solanki was a bus driver in MTNL Company whereas his mother was a homemaker. He got inspiration for taking up wrestling from his cousin named Sandeep. But major source of inspiration for joining wrestling was his own father because Mr. Diwan Singh was also a wrestler.

Sushil Kumar learnt all the Wrestling tit-bits from “Akhada” which is called a school for wrestling in India. This Akhada was in Chhatrasal Stadium. He started Wrestling at the tender age of 14 years. Although there are insufficient funds for wrestling and lack of proper trining is also there yet his family made it sure by sending him tinned milk, ghee and all beneficial vegetables that he always gets his full diet.

Sushil Kumar is presently employed as Chief Ticketing Inspector in Indian Railways.

Career:

Sushil Kumar got his training from Indian wrestlers Yashvir and Rampal. Later in his life he got a chance to seek coaching from Arjuna Award winner Satpal and by Coach Gyan Singh also. In his initial life he tolerated many tough conditions. But he wanted to achieve his goal so he did not let anything became hindrance in his way. After this he won State Wrestling Championship. Slowly but steadily he kept on stepping all the stairs of his destination.

Major Achievements:

Slowly but steadily Sushil Kumar kept on stepping all the stairs of his destination. Finally the day came when he represented India in World Cadet Wrestling Championship. Sushil Kumar made our India feel Proud of him in the World Cadet Championship by hitting the bull’s Eye. IN the World Cadet Championship this gloriously talented hypnotic and rock solid wrestler displayed his talent won the Gold Medal in the year 1998. But this was just a trailer of this frantically talented athlete.

In the year 2000 once again this super talented wrestler proved his metal in the Asian Junior Wrestling Championship and won the gold medal for our India.

These two excellent achievements achieved by Sushil kumar brought him in the good eyes of the selectors. Selectors gave him a chance to represent India in Men’s Asian Wrestling Championship where he once again added another feather to his cap by winning a Bronze Medal in the year 2003. But the full movie of his mesmerizing caliber was yet to be seen by the world. In the same year he repeated his success once again and this time he really made his presence felt all over the world very loudly and very clearly by winning Gold Medal in the Commonwealth Games for our India single handedly.

After this he got a chance to represent India in the World Wrestling Championship in the year 2004 at Athens. This time he got 14th position in the world Wrestling Championship. This was the toughest time of his career. But in the year 2005 he bounced back and once again he made our India feel proud of him as he won Gold medal again in the Commonwealth Wrestling Championship. In the year 2007 Sushil Kumar once again faced tough time in the World Wrestling Championship and got 7th position. But somehow Sushil Kumar qualified for 2008 Beijing Olympic Games where he once again won Bronze Medal for India. But before heading to 2008 Beijing Olympic Games Sushil once again won bronze medal in Asian Wrestling Championship.

For his unforgettable achievement Government of India awarded this glorious athlete with Arjuna Award in the year 2006.

But after this he went to china to represent India in Beijing Olympics 2008 where he won bronze Medal for our India.

Latest Achievement

But this time this super talented, graceful, wonderful, awesome, hypnotic, mesmerizing, frantic athlete has really proved his metal all over the world very clearly. He has not only proved his metal but the metal of India also. The achievement which he has acquired single handedly now has proven that an Indian can also win the World Championship. Yes everyone you are reading a truth. This time this glories athlete has Won Gold Medal for India in the World Wrestling Championship on 12th September 2010 by dashing Russian powerhouse wrestler Gogaev Alan by 3-1 single handedly in the grand Finale of World Wrestling Championship.

So at this unforgettable and wonderful achievement of Sushil Kumar i Kabir Bedi wish him many happy returns of the day on the behalf of my entire DLN Staff. We all wish that you will surely keep on giving us a chance to feel proud of you. Sushil Kumar you are the grace of our Great India. Nation expects a lot from him in the suture also. So we all are sure that the day will surely come when the entire world will surely see him standing on the top of the victory podium in the Olympic Games. The day will surely come when the whole world will surely see his broad and powerful chest strewed with beautiful Olympic Gold Medal Won Single Handedly.

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Re: Day 2 of Asian Wrestling Championships
« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2010, 07:50:18 AM »
Thanks Drooke,

Yup, I kept checking in on the tournament brackets.  I was pretty freaking psyched (even updated my facebook profile quote regarding the win yesterday) I wrote to the guy who invited us to the Kushti gym (Sushil trains there) and emailed the guy I coached with in India.

Other stuff not within the article:

1. Kumar is a vegetarian.  He gets most of his protein from drinking 4 to 5 liters of milk each day.  A gallon is just under 4 liters.

2. After he won a bronze in the 2008 Olympics, he was given a job within the security office of Indian Railroad Administration. The Indian Railway system is actually the largest employer in the world.  Many people get rewarded in India by getting jobs with them.  They don't actually have to show up to work, and get paid a salary to help them keep training.

3. Much press in India was about the three men who medaled in 2008.  A BB gun shooter (air riffle) won a gold (India's first individual gold medal), a boxer, and a wrestler.  The BB gun shooter has been everywehere on the TV.  He has made good money as a spokesperson for many stuff.  The boxer has become a teen-idol not unlike Mark Spitz did in the '70s.  Lastly, Kumar.  At first, I thought Kumar was going to make big bucks as a spokesperson (the guy is stacked!).  However, it simply never happened.  Maybe it was because he can't speak English (the other two can) or maybe it is his cauliflower ear (they're huge).  I hope this win yesterday will help him become a more cross-over star.  Based on the hyperbole of this article, I hope he will be as marketable as the boxer and BB gun shooter have become.


Oh, and I thought it was interesting that he started the sport at 14.  I thought that was rather old to pick up a sport.  I guess not.

Drooke

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Re: Day 2 of Asian Wrestling Championships
« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2010, 02:49:18 AM »
I too was surprised by the age they mentioned (14), but I was also interested in his story so I did another search just a few minutes ago and found another article....and this one states he started wrestling at the age of 12....

Here it is... http://www.livemint.com/2010/09/1718315 ... yface.html



Sushil Kumar is sitting bare-chested on his bed as Arvinder Pal Singh, the Indian wrestling team’s physiotherapist, carefully tapes his injured calf muscle. “It’s just a minor tweak,” Kumar says, “(need to) keep the muscle warm.” Kumar’s younger brother Amardeep enters the room holding a red T-shirt with a printed picture of Kumar pinning down an opponent in a tangle of limbs. It’s an iconic photograph, at least in wrestling circles, because it shows Kumar winning the bronze medal fight at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. “That’s a good one brother,” Kumar says, before turning his attention to us. “What will you drink? Lassi? Have you eaten? Do you want breakfast?”

King of the mat: Kumar says his achievements are finally giving wrestling the impetus it needs. ‘The next generation will benefit hugely from the improved infrastructure,’ he says. Priyanka Parashar/Mint

We are at the Sports Authority of India’s residential training centre for elite wrestlers in Sonepat on the outskirts of Delhi, a place Kumar calls home, and he is adamant that we eat and drink everything that is available at the canteen. His room, which he shares with three other wrestlers and his younger brother, is tiny, with barely enough room to stand next to the beds.

A small TV is perched on top of a steel cupboard, and jars of protein powder take up all the space on top of the solitary table. It’s not the kind of room you expect India’s first Olympic medallist in wrestling since 1952 to stay in.

“You should have seen how we stayed before I won the medal.” Kumar says in Hindi. “It was a hot, claustrophobic place with 20 people to a room. We hardly had enough space to lie down and sleep.”

The 27-year-old wrestler from a small village called Baprola in Haryana is the toast of the international wrestling community after becoming the first Indian to win a gold medal at the World Wrestling Championship in Moscow on 12 September. A win, Kumar himself says, that is bigger than his Olympic medal. “Wrestlers, officials and journalists from around the world came up to me after the final,” Kumar says. “They knew it was historic. I had beaten world champions, Asian champions and Olympic champions. There was a lot of celebration.”

A look at Kumar’s route to the final shows the extent of his domination—a 6-0 routing of Greece’s Akritidis Anastasios in the second round, a 4-1 triumph over Germany’s Martin Sebastian in the pre-quarters, a 9-1 thrashing of Mongolia’s Buyanjav Batzorig in the quarter-finals. A few months before the World Championship, Kumar had won gold at the 2010 Asian Wrestling Championship in similar fashion. From a bronze medallist at the 2008 Olympics, Kumar is now the undisputed champion of his category.

But before Kumar’s Olympic medal, wrestling was a sport that hardly crossed the boundaries of the village akhara, the traditional mud pits where heavily oiled wrestlers grapple across rural India. In the two years since Beijing, wrestlers have their own dedicated training centre in Sonepat complete with a state-of-the-art gym, and imported Olympic-standard mats have become ubiquitous at akharas across the country.

“My father was a wrestler who did it the traditional way. And even I began my wrestling in mud pits,” says Kumar. “But these changes were highly needed. Now that all these improvements have begun, our juniors will truly benefit from it. Now we will churn out international-level wrestlers.”

Kumar’s wrestling career began when he was just 12 and had gone to see his father Diwan Singh fight in a wrestling bout during a village festival. Kumar was so excited that he repeatedly tried to trip his father after the bout. “I was a pest,” he recalls, “but from the next day my father started training me.” By the time Kumar was 14, it was evident that he had a gift for the sport, and his father took him to the akhara run by legendary Indian wrestler Satpal Singh at the Chhatrasal Stadium in Delhi.

“That was my introduction to the lifestyle of a wrestler, where you sacrifice everything for the sport, and where your guru and the akhara are the only truths of your existence,” says Kumar. “Do you know, I’ve never even watched a movie in a theatre?”

Satpal Singh, who coached Kumar through most of the wrestler’s career, says Kumar’s success comes from his single-minded focus and his intensity in training. “He was quite a phenomenon even when he was really young,” says Singh. “If we told him to run a kilometre, he would do five. He would take on senior wrestlers without flinching. He could sustain himself bout after bout without getting demoralized or tired.”

Attributes you can still see clearly when Kumar trains. It’s so intense it’s painful—500 push-ups just to warm up, then 500 squats. Kumar hardly breaks a sweat before he grabs a 20ft rope and starts climbing up using only his arms. He does it quickly and efficiently, his torso rippling with muscles. Then he’s on the mat with a fellow wrestler, grappling, pushing, twisting and falling in quick succession.

He is built like a truck, but falls and recovers like a cat.

“Sushil’s success did not come overnight,” says Indian wrestling team’s chief coach Jagminder Singh. “He was the world cadet champion in 1998, the Asian junior champion in 2000, he won a bronze in the 2003 Asian Wrestling Championship. So it has been a long, successful road.”

Despite the long list of successes, it was only after the Olympics that Kumar burst into the limelight. When he landed in Delhi from Beijing, he was stunned at the reception he got.

“I have read of people dying in stampedes, but as a pehelwan I’ve always thought ‘I can’t die, I’ll just push my way through.’” Kumar chuckles. “But that day I felt fear—I realized even a wrestler can die in this kind of a crowd. This time, when I came back from Moscow, I was prepared.”

Kumar went straight back to training after returning triumphant from the World Championship, without even a day’s rest. Over the weekend, he says, he will go to his village to spend a day with his family.

“But every time I go to my village, everybody I meet—older people, younger people, groups of women—will come and tell me ‘you must work hard’. It’s such a bother!” Kumar says with a laugh. “But I’m glad the Commonwealth Games are in Delhi. Finally all these people in my village will be able to come and see me fight.”

rudraneil.s@livemint.com

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Re: Day 2 of Asian Wrestling Championships
« Reply #8 on: September 18, 2010, 02:00:01 PM »
Thanks for that article.  I am happy that this came from Mint.  Mint is a business newspaper (it is a sister paper to the WSJ).  Mint rarely talks about sports.  To have them write this piece should be seen as a big deal.

Last year I found a blurb on a blog about the conflict between the rural kushti gyms and the Indian Sports Commission.  Once Kumar won his bronze in '08, the Sports Commission made all top notch wrestlers move to the city of Pune (outside of Mumbai) to train in their facilities.  However, since many of these guys come from real rural areas, they could not train the way they used to.  They even were publically complaining that they were not getting the food they needed to train properly with (fresh milk, gee, almonds, etc...).

It seemed that the Sports Commission was so excited that they had a few world-class athlete in the country, they they tried to "help" them a bit too much (maybe they really wanted to help the....or....maybe they just wanted credit if Sushil gets a gold in 2012?).

I am glad that it looks like the wrestler's pleading won out and Sushil was allowed to train back in the outskirts of Delhi within his familier surroundings.  After all, if it ain't broke...