Author Topic: Drill vs Situations  (Read 1726 times)

Offline FalconWrestlingKY

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Drill vs Situations
« on: October 05, 2015, 08:21:17 pm »
As I am mapping out the practices for middle school, we just finished our first practice today, I have entered into a debate with the other coaches concerning our balance of drilling vs live situations.

Most of our wrestlers are in their first year and I want to make sure they have a good stance and positioning before we learn anything else. The other coaches make the important argument that I will bore the wrestlers and they need to build their wrestling IQ with live situational goes and mention how numerous coaches have suggested that. I agree with their point but I worry over letting our wrestlers develop bad habits without drills to get the refinement down.
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Offline brycemus

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Re: Drill vs Situations
« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2015, 03:09:45 pm »
throw each kid in for a 30 minute Ironman (new guy every 30 seconds) and see what you have.
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Offline fsgrecofolk

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Re: Drill vs Situations
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2015, 12:39:08 pm »
Ask Ray, he seems to have good ideas for teaching first year kids.

Offline Ray Brinzer

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Re: Drill vs Situations
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2015, 02:00:53 pm »
As I am mapping out the practices for middle school, we just finished our first practice today, I have entered into a debate with the other coaches concerning our balance of drilling vs live situations.

Most of our wrestlers are in their first year and I want to make sure they have a good stance and positioning before we learn anything else. The other coaches make the important argument that I will bore the wrestlers and they need to build their wrestling IQ with live situational goes and mention how numerous coaches have suggested that. I agree with their point but I worry over letting our wrestlers develop bad habits without drills to get the refinement down.

You need to strike a balance.  Bad habits don't develop any faster than good ones, and unless they're working on something specific, or wrestling in the same situations repeatedly, I wouldn't worry much in the short term.

I would suggest an approach of progressive refinement:  tolerate slop, at first, so long as they're getting in the ballpark of what you want.  But expect things to improve.  Insisting on great precision too early is a mistake, in my view, but so is allowing sloppy technique to continue.  Someone needs to watch, and make sure things keep moving in the right direction.

Choosing when to drill and when to experiment is a matter of judgment.  If you have a clear sense of what needs to happen, you'll pull out one tool or the other, at any given time, in order to keep making progress.  Sometimes the right answer is to drill; watch the athletes closely, decide how to get where you're going given what you're seeing right now.  That can be difficult with multiple coaches who aren't all on the same page, though.

It's worth mentioning that this is an area where I've changed a lot as a coach, over the years.  Closer to my competitive years, I went into a lot of detail, and was much more rigorous about precision.  More recently, I just tell athletes the important points, and then give them more information as they progress.  I think of it as being like teaching a kid to walk:  don't worry because they're wobbly and fall down a lot, at first.  That's how the process goes.

Offline NDKnowledge

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Re: Drill vs Situations
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2015, 01:22:42 pm »
I have struggled with this debate in my own wrestling room with my coaching staff as well. Here is what we do- Not saying it's right or wrong, but it seems to work well for us.

1- Instruction: Show the technique that you want to teach. Demonstrate it, Break it down step by step and walk the kids through it
2- Drill it: start slow- step by step at first and speed it up as they get comfortable with it.
3- Live Situations: Let them do some live situations to work on the new technique and the most important thing we find is that we need to be watching as many groups as possible. If the kids look like they have a pretty solid grasp on the move, we move on.
4- Reteach- If during live goes the kids show that they are not comfortable with the technique, or maybe just parts of the technique (hand placement, head position, etc.) we re-teach those areas of the technique, let them drill again with emphasis on the problem areas, then let them go live again.

The biggest issue on this is following practice plans and time-frames. Sometimes I have 3-4 techniques planned that I want to cover in a given day and we get to one of them and the kids just don't grasp it and we end up spending a lot more time than planned so we do not get to some of the other techniques. Other days, the kids pick up on them very fast, there is very little time spent in the reteaching phase, and we're left with "extra time" and need to find a filler for that time... the second problem is much easier as we can simply review techniques from the previous day or continue on with something new.

Offline Intensity guru

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Re: Drill vs Situations
« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2015, 02:00:17 pm »
Do not separate the two. Combine your stance, movement, position and handfighting drills with live goes.

Example:
3 whistles

1. start drill (observe)
2. live go (observe)
3. stop drill
 TEACH

This gets kids in the correct position/motion/tie and gives them, at least momentarily, a feel for wrestling where you want them.

Here is the best advice you will ever receive for Middle School success; Teach and drill defense more than anything else and watch your wins skyrocket. defense defense defense defense. At this level, the vast majority of attacks coming at them are poorly timed and executed. Kids are coached by amateurs to "be aggressive" at all costs. Taking advantage of your opponent constantly putting himself in horrible spots is a surefire recipe for winning. Solid position > solid head/hands defense > high percentage tactics and counter offense > effective front head tactics = easy wins.

Sounds simple but there's some sound psychology behind this. Kids at that age are extremely interested in winning and looking to develop their identity and something to identify with. If they win, they think "I'm a great wrestler." They begin to self-identify as a wrestler and become psychologically hooked. If you want big numbers to stick around and learn the details that bore them now, help them build confidence and identify as wrestlers by winning.
I always bring my hips to the party.