Author Topic: Loss of Control  (Read 552 times)

Offline red viking

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Loss of Control
« on: November 26, 2016, 09:38:24 am »
Hope the fellow coaches and officials have a great season. I'm pretty excited about it, again.

I do have a question that I've pondered many times in the past but haven't discussed in a long time and didn't have the chance to bring it up in our local officials meeting. I think this is something that is discussed between officials from time to time:

A takes down B. During a scramble, A is underneath and facing B (B may or may not have a front headlock) and "loses control." In other words, doesn't have the legs in any way. B is already in a superior position. The first question is, do you give an escape to B? I normally don't because they were never truly neutral. B went right from an inferior to superior position. If I give the escape then B can spin around the back and also get a very easy takedown on top of that. I normally just wait for the reversal or for A to at least get out from underneath before giving him an escape.

Now, even though A lost control, he then reaches out and locks his hands around one of B's legs, or gets one hand each around both legs. The period ends or they go out of bounds in this position. So the 2nd question is, do you award an escape since A did completely lose control (beyond reaction time) before he "unlost" it? Or do you just go with how they ended up and disregard what happened a few seconds earlier? I've been putting A on top during the restart but I think some officials give A the escape.

Thanks.
A foolish faith in authority is the worst enemy of truth - Albert Einstein, 1901

Offline matref0

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Re: Loss of Control
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2016, 03:04:58 pm »
I think you may have answered your own 2nd question by stating "loss of control beyond reaction time."  In those instances, I'm likely to award the escape.  If the offensives wrestler loses control and then is back on it (almost instantaneously) then I'll probably hold the call.  Officials can get in trouble by delaying the call too long in some instances.

I agree with your first question unless time expires or an out of bounds occurs.  Then you are probably looking at an escape.

Offline red viking

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Re: Loss of Control
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2016, 09:21:21 pm »
I think you may have answered your own 2nd question by stating "loss of control beyond reaction time."  In those instances, I'm likely to award the escape.  If the offensives wrestler loses control and then is back on it (almost instantaneously) then I'll probably hold the call.  Officials can get in trouble by delaying the call too long in some instances.

I agree with your first question unless time expires or an out of bounds occurs.  Then you are probably looking at an escape.

Thanks. So in the situation I describe above, A (after losing control beyond reaction time) locked his hands around a leg and then the wrestlers went out of bounds or period ended. I assume you're delaying awarding of the escape until the whistle as opposed to right away (because when he lost control he was already in a very bad position and close to getting reversed).
A foolish faith in authority is the worst enemy of truth - Albert Einstein, 1901