Author Topic: Heroes of Science  (Read 4524 times)

Offline n9531l

  • LXP
  • Get a Job
  • *
  • Posts: 5620
  • Hate nothin' but hatred
    • View Profile
Heroes of Science
« on: April 10, 2017, 04:37:17 PM »
If you have an interest in the history of science, I suggest you try to pick up a copy of the May 2017 issue of Discover magazine. It has a special section of stories about the scientists behind the most important scientific breakthroughs throughout history. Here's a trivia question you can answer if you read the article. What scientist played a crucial role in arguably the greatest discovery of the 20th century, but is mainly remembered today for having been forgotten?

Here are the people you can read about in the main article. How many of them do you already know about?

Albert Einstein
Alhazen
Marie Curie
Chien-Shiung Wu
Francis Beaufort
Isaac Newton
Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit
Anders Celsius
William Thompson, Lord Kelvin
James Prescott Joule
Alessandro Volta
Andre-Marie Ampere
Max Planck
Alexander Graham Bell
Charles F. Richter
Tetsuya "Ted" Fujita
Wilbur Scoville
Charles Darwin
Nikola Tesla
Galileo Galilei
Raymond Dart
Ada Lovelace
Pythagoras
Mary Anning
Carl Linnaeus
James Hutton
Rosalind Franklin
Henrietta Lacks

They also have a feature page on the "Great Dynasties of Science", including the Curies (Pierre Curie, Marie Curie, Irene-Joliot Curie, Eve Curie Labouisse), the Leakeys (Louis Leakey, Mary Leakey, Colin Leakey, Meave Leakey, Richard Leakey), the Alvarezes (Luis Fernandez Alvarez, Walter C. Alvarez, Luis Walter Alvarez, Walter Alvarez), and the Herschels (Sir William Herschel, Caroline Lucretia Herschel, Sir John Herschel, William James Herschel, Alexander Stewart Herschel).

Another feature page covers scientists who also spent time as popularizers, making scientific topics accessible to the public, including Sean M. Carroll, Rachel Carson, Richard Dawkins, Jane Goodall, Stephen Jay Gould, Stephen Hawking, Aldo Leopold, Bill Nye, Oliver Sacks, Carl Sagan, Neil DeGrasse Tyson, and E.O. Wilson.

In the final feature, the editors give "Our Personal Favorites", including Isaac Asimov, Richard Feynman, Robert Fitzroy, Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, Lucretius, Katharine McCormick, John Muir, Rolf O. Peterson, and Marie Tharp.

Even if you consider yourself an expert science historian, I think you'll find some interesting new tidbits about the personal lives of these "Heroes of Science".
Orthography is next to cleanliness, which is next to godliness. - n9531l

Online RYou

  • Get a Job
  • *
  • Posts: 14935
  • 3 out of 4 voices in my head want to sleep
    • View Profile
Re: Heroes of Science
« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2017, 09:06:39 PM »
Pure guess....Dr. Alois Alzheimer

Online ctc

  • Get a Job
  • *
  • Posts: 17114
    • View Profile
Re: Heroes of Science
« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2017, 09:50:07 PM »
Sure are many on that list that have actually contributed nothing for the betterment of society.
Several are on "ignore".   I won't argue with the ignorant and disrespectful..
 "People almost invariably arrive at their beliefs not on the basis of proof but on the basis of what they find attractive" ~ Blaise Pascal

Offline FalconWrestlingKY

  • Get a Job
  • *
  • Posts: 6407
    • View Profile
Re: Heroes of Science
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2017, 09:58:21 PM »
What scientist played a crucial role in arguably the greatest discovery of the 20th century, but is mainly remembered today for having been forgotten?

Is the answer Chein-Shiung Wu?
Topics Falcon doesn't know anything about- Cars, Binary, Accounting, and 13th Century Polish Literature

Offline n9531l

  • LXP
  • Get a Job
  • *
  • Posts: 5620
  • Hate nothin' but hatred
    • View Profile
Re: Heroes of Science
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2017, 04:10:40 AM »
Is the answer Chien-Shiung Wu?

No, but that's not a bad guess. After she became the first to verify Enrico Fermi's theory of radioactive beta decay, she later performed complex experiments confirming the hypothesis of a team of researchers about a breakdown of the law of parity. When the team won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1957, her contribution was never acknowledged.

However, the breakdown of parity doesn't come close to being the "greatest discovery of the 20th century".
Orthography is next to cleanliness, which is next to godliness. - n9531l

Offline n9531l

  • LXP
  • Get a Job
  • *
  • Posts: 5620
  • Hate nothin' but hatred
    • View Profile
Re: Heroes of Science
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2017, 04:14:58 AM »
Sure are many on that list that have actually contributed nothing for the betterment of society.

Yes, I'm sure there are some who can't hold a candle to ctc when it comes to the betterment of society. I think it's only his modesty that has kept him from telling us about his awards.
Orthography is next to cleanliness, which is next to godliness. - n9531l

Offline FalconWrestlingKY

  • Get a Job
  • *
  • Posts: 6407
    • View Profile
Re: Heroes of Science
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2017, 05:51:25 AM »
If it's not atomic theory then you have to be discussing penicillin
Topics Falcon doesn't know anything about- Cars, Binary, Accounting, and 13th Century Polish Literature

Offline n9531l

  • LXP
  • Get a Job
  • *
  • Posts: 5620
  • Hate nothin' but hatred
    • View Profile
Re: Heroes of Science
« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2017, 06:41:23 AM »
If it's not atomic theory then you have to be discussing penicillin

You're struggling, so I'll just give it away. The structure of the DNA molecule.
Orthography is next to cleanliness, which is next to godliness. - n9531l

Offline FalconWrestlingKY

  • Get a Job
  • *
  • Posts: 6407
    • View Profile
Re: Heroes of Science
« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2017, 07:06:31 AM »
See this is why I teach social studies instead of science
Topics Falcon doesn't know anything about- Cars, Binary, Accounting, and 13th Century Polish Literature

Offline n9531l

  • LXP
  • Get a Job
  • *
  • Posts: 5620
  • Hate nothin' but hatred
    • View Profile
Re: Heroes of Science
« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2017, 07:20:52 AM »
So who was the forgotten scientist?

There are various aspects of social studies where DNA figures in, although probably not the history of its discovery.
Orthography is next to cleanliness, which is next to godliness. - n9531l

Online ctc

  • Get a Job
  • *
  • Posts: 17114
    • View Profile
Re: Heroes of Science
« Reply #10 on: April 11, 2017, 07:32:38 AM »
Sure are many on that list that have actually contributed nothing for the betterment of society.

Yes, I'm sure there are some who can't hold a candle to ctc when it comes to the betterment of society. I think it's only his modesty that has kept him from telling us about his awards.
Nice snarky spin.  I never toot my own horn.  Yes, I do believe I have contributed more to society and many of them.  Many of them have actually been destructive to society.
Several are on "ignore".   I won't argue with the ignorant and disrespectful..
 "People almost invariably arrive at their beliefs not on the basis of proof but on the basis of what they find attractive" ~ Blaise Pascal

Online RYou

  • Get a Job
  • *
  • Posts: 14935
  • 3 out of 4 voices in my head want to sleep
    • View Profile
Re: Heroes of Science
« Reply #11 on: April 11, 2017, 08:14:10 AM »

Albert Einstein
Alhazen
Marie Curie
Chien-Shiung Wu
Francis Beaufort
Isaac Newton
Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit
Anders Celsius
William Thompson, Lord Kelvin
James Prescott Joule
Alessandro Volta
Andre-Marie Ampere
Max Planck
Alexander Graham Bell
Charles F. Richter
Tetsuya "Ted" Fujita
Wilbur Scoville
Charles Darwin
Nikola Tesla
Galileo Galilei
Raymond Dart
Ada Lovelace
Pythagoras
Mary Anning
Carl Linnaeus
James Hutton
Rosalind Franklin
Henrietta Lacks


Omitted from the DNA research team that was awarded the Prize because it was awarded after she died and they do not award to anyone posthumously.

Offline n9531l

  • LXP
  • Get a Job
  • *
  • Posts: 5620
  • Hate nothin' but hatred
    • View Profile
Re: Heroes of Science
« Reply #12 on: April 11, 2017, 11:20:02 AM »
Many of them have actually been destructive to society.

More than half? Would you care to tell us which half?

A judgement about bettering society depends on one's philosophy about what's important. In my view, activity that increases our store of knowledge about how the natural world works is a contribution to society, even if not direct or near-term.
Orthography is next to cleanliness, which is next to godliness. - n9531l

Offline scmathlete

  • Bantam
  • Posts: 11
    • View Profile
Re: Heroes of Science
« Reply #13 on: April 11, 2017, 12:18:45 PM »
The question that I like to ask is who was the best inventor before Otto Rhowedder. He single-handedly created the invention that is quite figuratively the measuring stick for all inventions since his.

Offline n9531l

  • LXP
  • Get a Job
  • *
  • Posts: 5620
  • Hate nothin' but hatred
    • View Profile
Re: Heroes of Science
« Reply #14 on: April 11, 2017, 05:00:39 PM »
Rosalind Franklin
Omitted from the DNA research team that was awarded the Prize because it was awarded after she died and they do not award to anyone posthumously.

RYou got it. A search will lead you to many accounts of the discovery. Often they mention Franklin as the one who missed out by dying too young, but don't give the details of her scientific work. Incidentally, even knowing she was mortally ill, she continued her work at a high level right up to her death from cancer at age 37.
Orthography is next to cleanliness, which is next to godliness. - n9531l