Author Topic: NLRB General Counsel Memo declares College FB and BB are to be Deemed Employees  (Read 632 times)

Offline RYou

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With a little pounding on the keyboard, the National Labor Relations Board General Counsel Jennifer Abruzzo released a memo Wednesday stating that college football players and many other athletes should be regarded as employees, paving the way for athletes to unionize and negotiate their working conditions.

NLRB General Counsel Jennifer Abruzzo also threatened action against schools, conferences, and the NCAA if they continue to use the term "student-athlete," saying that it was created to disguise the employment relationship with college athletes and discourage them from pursuing their rights.

The memo issued by Abruzzo, who was appointed by President Joe Biden, reversed a 2017 memo by her predecessor, an appointee of President Donald Trump. That decision had, in turn, overturned a memo of the previous general counsel, who was appointed by President Barack Obama.

Back in 2017, the full NLRB, not its general counsel, decided to not take up the Northwestern players' cause  and opted to not answer the central question: Are college athletes are employees? At the time, the NLRB said allowing Northwestern players to form a union would not promote "stability" in labor relations.

Offline Bob H.

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The NLRB forbids the schools to refer to them as student-athletes?!?  That is wrong on so many levels.  Just like in 1984, the government uses newspeak to determine acceptable language and to frame the narrative.  Since they are now considered employees and not student-athletes, will they still need to attend classes?  They should no longer be considered amateur athletes, but professionals on minor league teams.

Offline RYou

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They should no longer be considered amateur athletes, but professionals on minor league teams.


That's where we are headed at least with the scholarship schools. A lot of schools are already positioned to play (continue to play) as athletic associations.  Athletic programs at schools like U Georgia and Navy are administered by an Athletic Association, not the university.  It'll be an easy transition to pay the athletes independent to of the university.  Some universities will need to make funding contributions to the organizations, but the AA's will need to up their game with booster funding.